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DIY Tutorials Plant Care

Growing Monstera Deliciosa From Seed

Monstera deliciosas are a highly popular houseplant, native to parts of Mexico and Panama.  It’s popular because of the highly attractive and decorative foliage that the plants develop (see image below).  They’ve even become a trending thing on Instagram with #MonsteraMonday akin to #MancrushMonday.  Now, of course, I wanted to join the fun, but I couldn’t do it any old way!  I decided to purchase some Monstera deliciosa seeds from Amazon!

I’ll be providing periodic updates as they grow from hatchlings to full grown beasts!  I hear they’re quite slow to grow, but I like a challenge.  When I’m given a plant that’s fully grown or at least developed, there’s always trial and error to learn what kind of environmental conditions it need.

When I grow a plant from seed, I really learn the growing conditions that a plant thrives in.  I encourage my followers to try growing your favorite plants from seed.

You’ll find an enormous pride once the plant grows into adulthood from a simple seed.  Of course, if you lose the plant along the way, you’ll be kicking yourself.  But that’s why I like to start off with a healthy number of seeds, because I know that I will probably lose a few plants along the way!

How to Germinate

Sterilize the soil

I typically try to sterilize my soil when I’m seed starting.  I get my soil damp and spread it out over a plate.  I then microwave it for about 5 minutes (yeah it will smell funky as can be).  I let it cool and then dispense in the containers.

Seed prep

For these seeds, I don’t pre-score, soak them, or provide any special treatment. I simply bury the seed slightly, by just barely covering the seed completely with the sterilized soil.

The waiting game

The first seeds to germinate took about 5 days.  Some have taken about 3 weeks.  I’d say, on average, healthy monstera seeds will germinate in about 10-14 days under good conditions.  That means high humidity, and high heat.  Simple enough.  While it may feel tempting to put your seeds or seedlings to catch some sun, especially if you’re trying to heat the soil and activate germination, it is never a good idea to introduce direct outdoor sun to your seedlings.  At this age, the plants are far too young to experience direct sun.  It will burn them to hell.  Typically, in nature, they’ll start off growing under the canopy of an adult plant, shielded from the sun’s harshest rays.  If you’re trying to get additional heat or growing seeds in the winter, consider a grow mat and artificial lighting.

Humidity

To get the humidity necessary to activate germination, I usually put cling film over the pots, which seals in the moisture needed to sprout.  I remove the cling film soon after germination (for cacti, that’s another story and blog post).  Just make sure they don’t dry out!  They don’t have the moisture reserves that a normal plant would have.  Basically treat them like helpless babies.  Because they’re not far from it.  Stay tuned as I continue to provide progress shots and commentary below.

Can’t wait for my first hole-y leaf…

Bae•tanical

 

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30 Comments

  • Reply
    Sarah WIlson
    July 18, 2018 at 7:10 pm

    great info! i have just ordered some seeds on amazon and cant wait to try to grow my own little monsteras. did you water the seedlings daily while waiting for germination?

    • Reply
      james
      July 18, 2018 at 7:56 pm

      Hi Sarah!
      I don’t think I did give them any additional water while I was waiting for germination. Because I put them in their own little greenhouse (a sealed ziploc baggie or you can try cling film), they didn’t lose any of the moisture they started with so it wasn’t necessary.
      James

  • Reply
    Elaine
    August 17, 2018 at 10:49 pm

    What did the seeds look like? I just got some from eBay (risky I know! Lol) and they are super tiny flecks almost. I am going to try and see what happens. I have mine in an aluminum casserole pan with a plastic lid on top of a warming mat. Can’t wait to see what happens. How long did yours take to sprout above soil?

    • Reply
      james
      August 19, 2018 at 6:46 pm

      Hi Elaine!

      The seeds look like little brown peas from what I can remember. I bought mine off Amazon so sometimes you just have to take a risk and buy from a random dealer. Usually it works (I’ve had times when it doesn’t, of course). It sounds like your seeds might be a bit small, but just try them out and see! Your setup sounds perfect. Mine sprouted in about 1-2 weeks. Please keep me updated!!

      James

    • Reply
      Sara
      October 3, 2018 at 3:49 am

      The seeds are about the size of a large baked bean, light green in colour when fresh – they do tend to turn brown as they get older. On a heat mat in a mini greenhouse with good humidity levels (or pot covered with plastic kitchen wrap) with fresh seeds you would expect to see germination starting within 1-3 weeks. There are unfortunately a lot of dodgy seed sellers on Amazon and eBay. We have a small nursery and have not been let down yet by a seller on eBay called ‘The Seed Vine’.

      Hope that helps!

      • Reply
        james
        October 16, 2018 at 1:17 am

        This is wonderful information, Sara. Thank you for sharing!

  • Reply
    Lis
    September 20, 2018 at 9:53 pm

    Hi! Any new updates on the plants? Does it have to be special soil?

    Thanks, can’t wait to try 🙂

    • Reply
      james
      September 26, 2018 at 3:04 pm

      Hi Lis!

      I’m working on an update right now 🙂 I’ll have it up in the next couple of day and will cover soil. Good luck!

      James

    • Reply
      james
      October 16, 2018 at 1:16 am

      Hi Lis, I’ve posted a new Monstera deliciosa blog. Please take a look at it here. Happy gardening!

  • Reply
    fightingCora
    October 10, 2018 at 10:51 pm

    Found your blog by looking for someone who grew theirs from seeds. Mine arrived today and I am ready to get them started. Thanks for sharing!

  • Reply
    Zoe
    October 13, 2018 at 5:48 am

    Hello
    I brought some seeds off Etsy and they were black and flat. Does this sound right?
    Also, I’ve sprouted some and there are no leaves. They have like a white pointy end. I could send a pic. It’s very odd

  • Reply
    Zoe benjamin
    October 13, 2018 at 5:48 am

    Hello
    I brought some seeds off Etsy and they were black and flat. Does this sound right?
    Also, I’ve sprouted some and there are no leaves. They have like a white pointy end. I could send a pic. It’s very odd

    • Reply
      james
      October 16, 2018 at 1:13 am

      Hi Zoe! Those sadly do not sound like Monstera deliciosa seeds to me. I’ve added a description of what the seeds look like in my newest blog. You can see it here.

  • Reply
    Amin Hussain
    November 3, 2018 at 3:15 am

    Oh wow….6 days and I can see little shoots just poking through. I put 2 seeds in each pot, covered in cling film and then put them on top of the central heating.

    • Reply
      james
      November 4, 2018 at 10:39 pm

      Awesome! Can’t wait to hear how they develop.

      James

  • Reply
    Niki
    January 3, 2019 at 8:36 am

    Hello! This blog is the best info on growing Monstera on the entire internet!! Any suggestion on temperature? I tried out some seeds following your instructions, but maybe didn’t have enough heat. I’ve got some more, so wanted to check in before planting. Thanks for your help!

    • Reply
      james
      January 4, 2019 at 6:51 pm

      Hi Niki! It seems like between 70 and 76 degrees fahrenheit is the sweet spot. I use this heat mat during germination and it works excellent.

      https://amzn.to/2qQY1Sr

      • Reply
        niki
        January 4, 2019 at 8:54 pm

        Thanks so much James! I’ve got a heat mat under my little propagation station, so hopefully it works!

  • Reply
    Stan
    January 9, 2019 at 2:11 am

    I have the variegated and it has one fruit on it..variegated. About when is it ripe and any photos of the seeds in the fruit? Any idea if M.borsigiana fruit are fertile?

    • Reply
      james
      January 10, 2019 at 9:22 pm

      Hey Stan,

      I’m actually not sure! Can anyone else help him out with his question?

      James

  • Reply
    Majka
    April 27, 2019 at 5:53 pm

    Hi,

    I would like to order seeds of Monstera Variegata.
    Could you maybe send me a link where you’ve bought them?
    I see on your side are sold out.

    Thanks:)

    • Reply
      james
      April 30, 2019 at 3:19 pm

      Hi there! Most (if not all?) Monstera variegatas are propagated from cuttings. I don’t know if seeds breed true with the variegation or if they revert back to their typical non-variegated form once they’re crossed.

      I should have normal Monstera deliciosa seeds available for purchase again in July!

  • Reply
    George
    April 30, 2019 at 2:16 pm

    Would a jar with a lid work to seal in humidity? thanks!

    • Reply
      james
      April 30, 2019 at 3:16 pm

      I hadn’t thought about it before, but I think that would work. I would actually plant your seed in a typical plastic pot, then put the whole thing in the jar with the lid. I would not plant the soil directly in the jar because it wouldn’t have drainage in the future. Just want to clarify 🙂

      James

  • Reply
    How to propagate a Monstera. It's easy! - House Raccoon
    May 7, 2019 at 10:08 am

    […] Monstera sapling, three weeks after planting – Baetanical […]

  • Reply
    Marlene
    July 31, 2019 at 8:15 pm

    I have a monstera seed pod. How do i know when they are ready to plant.

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